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Nicholas Kristof
Nicholas Kristof: “Empowering women is a security issue.”

New York Times columnist Nick Kristof recently spoke at the home of Inclusive Security’s founder, Ambassador Swanee Hunt. Noting that “where [Afghan] moms are a little more empowered, they keep their sons out of the Taliban,” he suggested shifting investments from the “military toolbox” to women’s education and leadership. Scroll down to view video.


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Iraq’s At-risk Youth become Champions of Peace
Iraq's at-risk youth become Champions of Peace
Iraqi youth want to play a bigger role in social change .

BY PARTNERS FOR DEMOCRATIC CHANGE

Youth have the potential to be powerful advocates for change. Partners’ Iraq Youth project provides young men and women with the skills to make their voices heard in decision making and play a positive role as peacemakers.

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Population Age Structure and Its Relation to Civil Conflict: A Graphic Metric

BY RICHARD CINCOTTA AND ELIZABETH LEAHY

Recent studies suggest that a large “youth bulge”—a youthful population age structure—can increase the risk of the onset of civil conflict and political violence (Urdal, 2006, Cincotta et al., 2003). These studies exclude states with a recent history of civil conflict, reasoning that they are already highly vulnerable to persistent and re-emerging violence (Collier et al., 2002). Can these two quantifiable variables—population age structure and recent history of civil unrest—be used to project risks of civil conflict a decade into the future?

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Marib Youth and Political Transition in Yemen
Yemenis protest, holding signs saying, "Where is the development? Where is the gas?" in Marib. (Photo: Mareb Youth Facebook page)
Yemenis protest, holding signs saying, “Where is the development? Where is the gas?” in Marib. (Photo: Mareb Youth Facebook page)

BY NADWA AL-DAWSARI

Over the past few years, Marib, a tribal area 120km northeast of Sana’a, has made the headlines for all the wrong reasons. It has allegedly been a staging ground for al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) operations targeting security and military personnel as well as oil pipelines. When the popular protests started in early 2011 demanding the removal of then-President Ali Abdullah Saleh from power, Marib was the source of frequent attacks on oil pipelines and the main power plant, leading to severe shortages in electricity and fuel supply throughout the country until today. But these security threats overshadowed a nascent and active youth movement.

Early on in Yemen’s transition, Maribi youth led a vibrant and increasingly thriving campaign of civic activist. During the popular protests in 2011 and 2012, Maribis established a tent in Marib city from which they organized civic education sessions, social media activities, and regular protests. Maribi youth joined other protesters from all over the country in Sana’a’s Change Square. Coming from well-armed tribes where they are considered tribal warriors, their participation in peaceful protests came as a surprise to many activists.

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Rule of Law and Justice Development in Post-Conflict – Centre for International Governance Innovation (CIGI)

15 Years after Dayton, 10 years after the Invasion, 9 years after Bonn, 5 years after the CPA, what have we achieved in terms of establishing Rule of Law and Judicial Institutional Building in Bosnia, Iraq, Afghanistan and Sudan.

In this talk, based on field experience and academic reflection, Dhillon will shed some light on some of the lessons learned from the international community’s intervention in Rule of Law and Justice Sector Development in these states.

It is believed that the billions of dollars in aid money and the thousands of international personnel that have been sent to these countries to implement development programs may not have achieved enough to balance the cost and time that has been spent.

If so, what lessons can we glean from these experiences and how can we move forward to contributing positively to development of justice and security in these countries and regions.



More about the Speaker:
Currently, Jasteena is a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School and an Affiliate Fellow with Harvard’s South Asia Initiative, previously she was an Associate Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. At Harvard, Jasteena does research, teaching and writing on justice and rule of law, informal and formal justice systems in conflict, post-conflict and transitional countries and regions.

Jasteena Dhillon is a graduate of University of Toronto in Sociology in 1990 and of University of Windsor Law School and holds a Masters of Law in International law from Leiden University in the Netherlands. From 1989 — 1992, she worked in Toronto on community development and advocacy in the violence against women movement and on issues facing immigrants and refugees.

She started as a Student Activist in the South Asian student movement in Toronto and continued after graduation as a Community Advocate and Counsellor at Toronto area women’s shelters, including Emily Stowe, North York, East York, Homeward, Ernestine’s and at crisis centres for women and girls Stop 86 and Windsor Sexual Assault Centre and also worked on a project for the Ministry of the Solicitor General on training police on appropriate intervention techniques for domestic violence.

In 1997, after graduation from law school and her call to the Bar in Ontario, she worked at the Office of the children’s lawyer representing children in child abuse, custody and access and civil litigation cases and have been concerned with the rights and protection of children and immigrants in Canada.

Since 1999, she has been working internationally in conflict, post-conflict and transitional countries and regions on justice and human rights issues. She went first to work on the South African constitutional drafting process, she has continued to work internationally on legal and development and human rights issue in conflict, post-conflict and transitional crisis areas around the world, including in Afghanistan, Southern Sudan, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Bosnia, Croatia, Occupied Palestinian Territory and South Africa in international non-governmental organizations, the United Nations and North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

She has worked all over the world on human rights and development issues for women, children, refugees, IDPs in conflict and post-conflict settings, with a special emphasis on issues ranging from development of rule of law institutions and governance, the role of customary and sharia legal systems, human rights and humanitarian law , duties and responsibilities of national and international actors in building judicial and political institutions and civil-military interaction strategy and tools in the evolution of states and regions from crises to stability.

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Rule of Law Expert Jasteena Dhillon discusses Informal Justice

Jasteena Dhillon is a graduate of University of Toronto in Sociology in 1990 and of University of Windsor Law School and holds a Masters of Law in International law from Leiden University in the Netherlands. From 1989 — 1992, she worked in Toronto on community development and advocacy in the violence against women movement and on issues facing immigrants and refugees.

She started as a Student Activist in the South Asian student movement in Toronto and continued after graduation as a Community Advocate and Counsellor at Toronto area women’s shelters, including Emily Stowe, North York, East York, Homeward, Ernestine’s and at crisis centres for women and girls Stop 86 and Windsor Sexual Assault Centre and also worked on a project for the Ministry of the Solicitor General on training police on appropriate intervention techniques for domestic violence.

In 1997, after graduation from law school and her call to the Bar in Ontario, she worked at the Office of the children’s lawyer representing children in child abuse, custody and access and civil litigation cases and have been concerned with the rights and protection of children and immigrants in Canada.

Currently, Jasteena is a Visiting Scholar at Harvard Law School and an Affiliate Fellow with Harvard’s South Asia Initiative, previously she was an Associate Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. At Harvard, Jasteena does research, teaching and writing on justice and rule of law, informal and formal justice systems in conflict, post-conflict and transitional countries and regions.


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Ending Wars Well: Order, Justice, and Conciliation

November 8, 2012 | Why don’t wars “end well?” From Rwanda to Colombia to Afghanistan, it seems that modern wars drag on and on, with terrible costs for civilians and their neighbors. In his new book, Ending Wars Well, Berkley Center Senior Research Fellow Eric Patterson argues that just war principles can provide a framework for bringing wars to modest yet enduring conclusions. More specifically, he criticizes grandiose peace schemes that are not rooted in the realities of security and political order. In contrast, he proposes a model that begins with investment in Order as a practical and moral imperative. This provides a foundation for Justice (e.g. punishment, restitution) and Conciliation in unique situations.

Patterson uses Iraq, Afghanistan, Sudan, East Timor, the Camp David Accords, and the US Civil War as test cases for this model. The Berkley Center’s Timothy Samuel Shah moderated Patterson’s discussion with LtCol John Gallagher, a former West Point professor and current staff officer to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.


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Traditional Justice and the Pokot Tribe in Kenya

Now, many people seek justice in courtrooms, looking to the modern justice system to resolve conflicts… But among members of the Pokot community in Baringo County an age old tradition of conflict resolution lives on. It allows residents to solve modern day conflicts in the traditional way. This is by first allowing the aggrieved parties to vent their anger through a physical fight. The fight is to prepare the parties for the hearing of their case conducted by elders under a tree. It is a tradition passed on from one generation to another.


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The Wajir Story–ACTIONSupportCentre

This is the story of a peace-building initiative which started with a group of women in Wajir, north-eastern Kenya, spread quickly to all sections of the community, and reached up into government. It is told through the voices of those who took part in it, who mobilized their community to halt escalating violence and who are still struggling to achieve peace and stability – for this is not a finished event.

The film was commissioned by Responding to Conflict and the Coalition for Peace in Africa, in partnership with the Wajir Peace and Development Committee. It was filmed by Robert Maletta, produced by Trojan Horse Productions, with funding from Comic Relief.


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Women War Peace: The Politics of Peacebuilding

Three women of international renown share their experience in fostering peace and human rights in Uganda, the Philippines and Colombia in this edition of the Joan B. Kroc Distinguished Lecture Series at the Institute for Peace & Justice at the University of San Diego. Series: “Joan B. Kroc Institute for Peace & Justice Distinguished Lecture Series”


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