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Sexual harassment and assault key reason for low number of Afghan women police

In 2014, the number of Afghan women serving as police officers continues to be shockingly low, constituting less than 2% of the police force. This is in large part due to high rates of sexual harassment and, at times, sexual assault. Sexual harassment is also rampant in other government entities and private workplaces as well. Heather Barr, senior women’s rights researcher at Human Rights Watch, notes, “The Afghan government should promptly enact a law against sexual harassment and ensure that every government institution develops and implements an anti-sexual harassment policy.” Read full article.

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Sisters in Islam

Sisters in Islam (SIS) is a civil society organization committed to promoting the rights of women within the frameworks of Islam and universal human rights. Its efforts to promote the rights of Muslim women are based on the principles of equality, justice and freedom enjoined by the Qur’an. SIS’ work focuses on challenging laws and policies made in the name of Islam that discriminate against women. SIS areas of work also include the issues of democracy, human rights and constitutionalism, as well as urging the observance of human rights principles and international treaties and conventions signed by the Malaysian Government.

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Inclusive Security National Action Plan Resource Center

The Institute for Inclusive Security intends to build a community—from government, civil society, and beyond—that shares a commitment to building stability through inclusive policies and practices. Our vision is for this Resource Center to build upon and share the tremendous contributions of other pioneers. It’s also intended to be a hub for learning new strategies, sharing successes and challenges, and easily finding not just information, but also useful analysis and tools.

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Stockholm International Peace Research Institute

Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) is an independent international institute in Sweden, dedicated to research into conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament. Established on 6 May 1966, SIPRI provides data, analysis and recommendations, based on open source, to policymakers, researchers, media and the interested public.

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Woman Stats Project and Database

The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. They comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 360 indicators of women’s status in 175 countries. The Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.

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Gender and Military Issues: A categorized research bibliography

An extensive interdisciplinary overview of studies on gender issues in a military context. The bibliography presented covers more than 2,500 references of internationally reviewed articles, reports, books and theses from both military and non-military institutions. The references have been categorized into themes such as “Men & Masculinities,” “Sexual Harassment & Abuse,” “Physical Ability,” etc. It is fair to say that it should represent an essential tool for military leaders, scholars and politicians interested in gender issues in a military context.

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SIPRI co-hosts meeting between Malian traditional leaders and women’s groups

On September 16–18 Malian traditional leaders and women’s associations met in Bamako to discuss their contributions to a lasting peace in Mali.

The three-day forum, which was organized by SIPRI’s Mali Civil Society and Peacebuilding Project in cooperation with its local partner organization in Mali, CONASCIPAL, was the first opportunity for traditional authorities (including religious leaders) and women’s associations from all regions of Mali to meet to discuss how they could potentially contribute to the consolidation of peace and development in Mali. Read full article.

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Sri Lankan Women’s Struggle for Security and Justice

Spring 2013 – The 8th brief in ICAN’s “What the Women Say” series focuses on women in Sri Lanka’s northern provinces in the aftermath of war. Drawing on a survey conducted in ten war-torn districts and discussions with over 450 women, it reflects on women’s legal gains and their activism for peace and human rights while also highlighting the critical security, economic and social risks that many women face. The recommendations we offer to the Sri Lankan government and the international community reflect the survey findings and priorities outlined in the 2012 Sri Lankan Women’s Agenda on Peace, Security and Development. Read full brief.

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